vegansaurus!

05/18/2011

Calling all vegan bakers! Let’s flood Pie or Die!  »

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OK bakers, let’s do this! Pie or Die!…Part Deux is coming to San Francisco, courtesy of SF Food Wars. It’s being held at the Ferry Building and they are looking for competitors! Pull out your aprons, your oven mitts, your rolling pins and get to work! Be creative, be classic, I don’t care, just make the best vegan pie of your life! (or, pies? You must make enough to sample out to at least 70 peeps.) Enter to compete here.

The competition takes place Saturday, June 12 and is free to enter, but space is limited to 20 competitors, so sign up RIGHT NOW!! Don’t even worry about finishing this post. Seriously. Sign up. Now. Pie must be sweet (as opposed to savory) and feature at least one ingredient from the Ferry Plaza Farmer’s Market. You can do this! Vegansaurus believes in you! [Ed.: And VEGANS HAVE WON BEFORE! So get up on this!]

Proceeds benefit the SF Food Bank and the Center for Urban Education about Sustainable Agriculture.

09/23/2010

Thursday: A good day for marble bundt cake (and its recipe)!  »

Knowing how to bake vegan is awesome. Sure, in larger cities, we’re pretty spoiled, and we can find vegan baked goods in cafes and grocery stores and sometimes even in vegan bakeries. However, even in the larger cities, there are still a lot more non-vegan baked goods than vegan ones, and there’s nothing worse than spying a lovely vision of a pastry or cake and then realizing it’s not vegan and that there’s no vegan version to be found… which brings me back to my original point: knowing how to bake vegan is awesome. Why? Because next time you see a sweet little non-vegan thing at the store or on a blog or in the newspaper or in a cookbook, you can smile to yourself and whip yourself up a superior vegan version at home.
This is a recipe that I doctored up when I had an insatiable, need-it-now craving for bundt cake this weekend (what, like you don’t get bundt cravings?). I came across this recipe for a marble bundt cake during an epic internet session this weekend, and I tell you, it spoke to me! The blogged recipe is for a chocolate-and-lemon marbled bundt, but since this Vegansaur thinks chocolate and lemon is a nasty-ass combo, I veganized it AND made it into a stately, elegant vanilla/chocolate combo.

The result, if I do say so myself, was pretty bangin’. Here’s the veganized recipe, and remember, bundts travel well, so this is a great cake for bringing to work (either to share or to hide in your desk and eat solo), on picnics, to the beach—whatever. This recipe makes a cake good enough to eat unadorned, but you can also top it with jam, vegan whip (whatever kind floats your boat), chocolate sauce, or fruit compote. The possibilities are endless!

Ingredients
2 cups sugar
1/3 cup cocoa powder
1 cup Earth Balance(or your butter analog of choice)
egg replacer for four eggs (I used a combo of 2 Ener-G eggs and 1/3 cup plain soy yogurt)
3 1/2 cups cake flour (you can use regular if it’s all you’ve got, but I like the cake flour—it’s so fancy!)
1 Tbsp baking powder
1/2 tsp salt
1 1/4 cups nondairy milk (I use almond)
2 tsp vanilla extract
2 to 3 Tbsp booze, such as Kahlua, rum, Frangelico (optional)

Directions
1. Prep your bundt pan (grease it and then lightly flour it) and preheat your oven to 350.

2. Cream together your “butter” and sugar. Make sure to mix it until it gets slightly fluffy and the color lightens slightly. Add in your egg replacer slowly and continue to beat the mixture until all the ingredients are incorporated, and it’s silky-looking.

3. In a medium-sized bowl, mix together the flour, baking powder, and salt. Then add half the dry mixture to the wet mixture and stir to combine. Add half the nondairy milk and the vanilla to the mixture and combine. Repeat addition of dry and then wet until the batter is smooth. Warning: do NOT overmix, unless you’re into dry, tough cakes.

4. Pour half the batter into prepared bundt pan; keep the other half in the mixing bowl. Add the cocoa (and booze if you are using it) to the reserved batter and mix to combine. Then pour the chocolate batter into the bundt pan. Use a butter knife to swirl around the batters and incorporate them into each other. Bake for 50 to 60 minutes, or until a toothpick inserted into the middle of the cake comes out clean.

Let the thing cool for a while before you try to take it out of the pan—attempting to remove it while it’s still warm will only result in tears!

Enjoy for breakfast, lunch, or dinner!

05/19/2010

You know what’s super-duper easy to make, and super-duper delicious to eat? Focaccia! I made it for the first time on Saturday, and it was good, but the focaccia I made on Monday night was amazing. I could have died of joy, it was so good.
I followed this recipe, about which I was skeptical because of the potato, but my prior recipe didn’t use a potato and it was a bit dry, and one must be bold to reach baking heights, so potato it was.
Per usual, I altered it a little more; specifically,where it calls for 2 tablespoons of olive oil in the dough and 1 tablespoon on the top of the bread, I used 1/4 cup in the dough and 1/4 cup on top, plus chopped fresh rosemary, minced garlic (four cloves), and sliced plum tomatoes, because that was what was around.
Result: rich, fluffy, moist, airy focaccia that, were I not already half-full from a massive long-stemmed artichoke (braised in olive oil; I may have more olive oil and garlic than human blood at this point), I could have completely devoured on my own.
Happily, I didn’t, and now I can have toasted focaccia spread with homemade almond cheese for lunch this afternoon. You guys should seriously make this; it’s so simple and good, you won’t ever want to buy focaccia again.
EtA: This is my almond cheese recipe! I even blanched the almonds for it, which was really annoying.
[I would’ve removed the bread from the cooling rack before photographing, but it was too heavy with olive oil and too hot from being fresh out the oven, and I was too dying-to-eat-it to wait any longer.]

You know what’s super-duper easy to make, and super-duper delicious to eat? Focaccia! I made it for the first time on Saturday, and it was good, but the focaccia I made on Monday night was amazing. I could have died of joy, it was so good.

I followed this recipe, about which I was skeptical because of the potato, but my prior recipe didn’t use a potato and it was a bit dry, and one must be bold to reach baking heights, so potato it was.

Per usual, I altered it a little more; specifically,where it calls for 2 tablespoons of olive oil in the dough and 1 tablespoon on the top of the bread, I used 1/4 cup in the dough and 1/4 cup on top, plus chopped fresh rosemary, minced garlic (four cloves), and sliced plum tomatoes, because that was what was around.

Result: rich, fluffy, moist, airy focaccia that, were I not already half-full from a massive long-stemmed artichoke (braised in olive oil; I may have more olive oil and garlic than human blood at this point), I could have completely devoured on my own.

Happily, I didn’t, and now I can have toasted focaccia spread with homemade almond cheese for lunch this afternoon. You guys should seriously make this; it’s so simple and good, you won’t ever want to buy focaccia again.

EtA: This is my almond cheese recipe! I even blanched the almonds for it, which was really annoying.

[I would’ve removed the bread from the cooling rack before photographing, but it was too heavy with olive oil and too hot from being fresh out the oven, and I was too dying-to-eat-it to wait any longer.]

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