vegansaurus!

06/19/2012

Another June Challenge champion! These are Shawn’s yellow canary beans! He describes them as

Really good, a cross between a lima and pinto bean taste-wise.
I seasoned them with some salt, pepper, cayenne pepper, cumin, and fresh lemon juice; I also add cooked onion, garlic, and carrot, and served it over quinoa.

Congratulations, Shawn! Doesn’t that sound good? I love a good, simple, beans-and-quinoa recipe. And by “love” I mean, “I eat beans and quinoa like five times a week.” Yellow canary beans, by the way, are huge in Mexico, but totally rare and controversial in the U.S. because of this crazy bio-patent.
I highly recommend reading Gillian N. Rattray’s iBrief about it, because it features such beautiful phrases as “If yellow beans are found in prior art, the isolation of the Enola bean may be an obvious step for ordinarily skilled bean breeders” and “the idea of a chip patent was so outrageous that it caused this author to learn about ‘misappropriated’ beans.”
See what happens when you try new foods? You learn about biopiracy, and get to picture U.S. Customs agents sorting beans to determine whether they’re yellow enough to infringe on a patent! Thanks, Shawn! Everyone else looking to expand their culinary (and legal) vocabulary, take the June Challenge, and please share the results with us!

Another June Challenge champion! These are Shawn’s yellow canary beans! He describes them as

Really good, a cross between a lima and pinto bean taste-wise.

I seasoned them with some salt, pepper, cayenne pepper, cumin, and fresh lemon juice; I also add cooked onion, garlic, and carrot, and served it over quinoa.

Congratulations, Shawn! Doesn’t that sound good? I love a good, simple, beans-and-quinoa recipe. And by “love” I mean, “I eat beans and quinoa like five times a week.” Yellow canary beans, by the way, are huge in Mexico, but totally rare and controversial in the U.S. because of this crazy bio-patent.

I highly recommend reading Gillian N. Rattray’s iBrief about it, because it features such beautiful phrases as “If yellow beans are found in prior art, the isolation of the Enola bean may be an obvious step for ordinarily skilled bean breeders” and “the idea of a┬áchip patent was so outrageous that it caused this author to learn about ‘misappropriated’┬ábeans.”

See what happens when you try new foods? You learn about biopiracy, and get to picture U.S. Customs agents sorting beans to determine whether they’re yellow enough to infringe on a patent! Thanks, Shawn! Everyone else looking to expand their culinary (and legal) vocabulary, take the June Challenge, and please share the results with us!

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