vegansaurus!

10/15/2010

Adopting bunnies, eating ramen, pie making contests & more! It’s your weekend activities!  »

We’re here to make your weekend amazing! Do the damn thing(s):

Saturday, Oct. 16
The House Rabbit Society and Harvest Home Sanctuary will have their regular adoption event today! Go see the bunnies from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. at George in Berkeley! Harvest Home Sanctuary and House Rabbit Society buns will be waiting for you in the Fourth Street Shopping Center at 1824 Fourth St. Why not look at some of them now?

It’s the Berkeley’s Walk for Farm Animals today! Go! Walk! Be awesome and help animals and walk it out for a good cause!

Help a Brother Out bakesale and street food party fundraiser in the mission. All sorts of delicious baked goods (in the afternoon!) and street food (in the evening!) and GO!

SwapSF is back! I feel like this counts as vegan because when people obtain leather shoes or woolen sweaters through trade, they’re stopping the supply-and-demand cycle that keeps new leather shoes and woolen sweaters in production. y/y? Also it’s good for the environment, and SwapSF always has drink specials because the organizers love drinking in the early afternoon. Buy a $6 presale ticket and bring your tradeable clothes to Mighty at 119 Utah St. (between 15th and Alameda Streets); the swap goes from noon to 3 p.m.

Sunday, Oct. 17
It’s the 8th Annual Spice of Life Festival in Berkeley! From 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Shattuck Avenue between Rose and Virginia Streets (five blocks!), there will be all kinds of Berkeleyania—an “eco-carnival,” an “interactive nature sculpture project,” a puppet show—but also awesome foodstuffs from places we love: Saturn Cafe, Scream Sorbet, Flacos; plus some places that sound like they should be vegan, like Raw Daddy Foods, Chick ‘o Peas falafel, Skylite Snowballs; and Chairman Bao makes a crispy tofu bun. Best: it’s free. Have fun, East Bay!

Mission Pie’s fourth annual Pie Contest is today! Did you enter? You still have until 5 p.m. on Friday, Oct. 15 to do so! Just send an email with your name, type of pie, and contact information, then bring your pie to Mission Pie at 2901 Mission St. at 25th Street between 2 and 2:30 p.m. on Sunday!
Did you want to come sample the pies? Show up at the same place around the same time, pie-free. Easy-peasy.

Southern Ramen and Blues from 6 to 10 p.m. at Gravel and Gold—we told you all about it already, remember?

Wednesday, Oct. 20
There will be a protest against the Grand National Rodeo held at the Cow Palace (2600 Geneva Ave. in Daly City) on Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday of this week. The protests are scheduled from 6 to 7:30 p.m., and banners and signs will be provided. This is all the information we have now; we’ll give you more as we get it.

Friday, Oct. 22
Next weekend already? Yes, it’s important: Carol J. Adams is speaking at UC Berkeley! The Berkeley Organization for Animal Advocacy put this together; aren’t they great? Ms. Adams will speak from 2 to 4 p.m. in 2060 VLSB on campus; “many vegan treats” will be provided, and Ms. Adams’ books The Sexual Politics of Meat and The Pornography of Meat will be available for purchase.

Even later this month!
On Wednesday, Oct. 27 at the Saturn Cafe in Berkeley (2175 Allston Way at Fullton Street), Stephanie Redcross of Vegan Mainstream will have answers to your questions about making your vegan blog the best vegan blog it can be! This seminar/Q&A is called Unleashing the Power of Efficient Vegan Marketing, is scheduled for 6 to 8 p.m., and is free with registration. Naturally, Karine Brighten Events is hosting.

Don’t forget about the East Bay Vegan Bakesale! It’s happening on Saturday, Oct. 30 from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., in front of Issues (20 Glen Ave. at Piedmont) in Oakland. All proceeds will benefit Mickaboo Companion Bird Rescue and the East Bay Children’s Book Project. Want to volunteer (of course you do!)? Email the organizers!

01/13/2010

Un-Cookbook review: The Raw Healing Patch! Veganize your rawness!  »

In my last post on Vegansaurus, I offered a few strategies for making raw organic foods more accessible and affordable, especially for young people and lower-income folks living in the Bay Area. Wherever you fall on the raw-to-cooked spectrum, it’s indisputable that the raw food movement is helping to bring more folks into the vegan fold, which is something all vegans can be happy about. It seems to me that if we find creative ways to motivate raw foodists to go full-on vegan (e.g., rain down on them with mad knowledge, advice, free vegan food and love), we can help them discover that, through raw veganism, they can make a huge difference not only for their own health, but also for the health of the planet. A couple good places to start are local nonprofit People’s Grocery and Lauren Ornelas’ fabulous food justice/human rights/environmental advocacy group the Food Empowerment Project, which work to source ethical products and make organic produce accessible to everyone.

In the spirit of accessibility, I recently got my hands on a copy of The Healing Patch Cookbook produced by the down-to-earth, super-ecologically conscious, queer veg couple Julie Cara Hoffenberg and Sarah Woodward, who together make up the raw food team known as The Healing Patch. The cookbook, which they were kind enough to also make available in an eco-friendly e-book format, is utterly unpretentious, and a great way to usher rawies into the ethical vegan eating path. Hoffenberg and Woodward make clear throughout the witty cookbook that their way of eating and (un)cooking is just that—their way—and that they would never wish to impose them on anyone else; yet they are very clear that raw veganism has remarkably improved their lives. Healing Patch’s primary goal is to offer gentle coaxing to adopt a raw vegan lifestyle, basing their recipes and advice on what helped Woodward heal after her battle with ovarian cancer. Thankfully, they do this without laying on the sorts of guilt-trips or strict guidelines usually found in these .

Healing Patch’s recipes are really easy to make, require no esoteric ingredients, and have cute little factoids, including nutritional profiles. They also offer useful tips on economical home sprouting, gardening, selecting the best produce for each season, and how to substitute recipe ingredients for whatever is local and fresh whenever possible. They succeed at providing ample tricks for being a raw vegan while healing yourself and the planet at the lowest possible expense.

The one issue I take with this otherwise charming volume is that some of the recipes include dairy, ostensibly in order to help folks to “transition more gently” to raw veganism. This is disappointing, especially since the authors clearly believe in the tenets of raw veganism and oppose cruelty and oppression. It seems to me like the duo hasn’t quite made the connection that the dairy industry is horribly cruel and directly supports the meat industry. Maybe they should pick up feminist masterpiece The Sexual Politics of Meat by my personal hero Carol J. Adams—which, by the way, has just been released in a newly updated 20th anniversary edition!

Once Healing Patch gets educated in the ways of vegan feminism by Adams, I’m sure they’ll be willing to make all of their recipes totally vegan. Feel free to comment to them about this on their website—it will be good practice for the raw foodists you’ll be converting to raw veganism in the near future! Anyway, hopefully the next edition of The Healing Patch (which I do hope they eventually write!) will address this concern.

This is the second post written by Sarah E. Brown. Thanks, Sarah!

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