vegansaurus!

03/31/2014

Faux Moccs: Stylish vegan shoes for kids are here!  »

Finding vegan shoes for children isn’t very easy. I had been searching high and low for about six months with only a few questionable pairs to show for it when I heard about Faux Moccs, a company created by Kortney Campbell, one of the Vegan Housewives, I knew that I had found my solution. I interviewed her for an in-depth look into this vegan mom-run company. 

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According to Kortney, the soft-bottom design of Faux Moccs is especially important for the development of baby and toddler feet. The sylish design of the Faux Moccs encourages babies and toddlers to spread their toes and feet naturally while still offering protection from the outdoors. The fact that children’s developing feet were taken into consideration in the construction of the shoe makes them worth their weight in eco-friendly material. They are made from either nylon or polysester fiber matric manufactured in the USA (the vast majority being nylon). They are breathable and water resistant with no PVC, vinyl or plasticizers. Eco-friendly, vegan, AND biomechanically sound? This is a combo unlike any I’ve ever seen in the kids’ shoe department.

Kortney came up with Faux Moccs when she was having a hard time finding cruelty-free footwear for her 17-month-old son, Judah. Once she realized that other moms were probably having the same issues, she decided to veganize a shoe that would fit her (and his) needs. She tapped into her love of moccasins, her degree in fashion design, and her hero, Betsey Johnson, for inspiration. The resulting design is nothing short of genius. The array of colors offered combined with the handsome look of the shoe are sure to make any mom happy to dress up her little one for a playdate. Kortney says she hopes to release new designs with each season — our kids can be fashionable all year long as they outgrow their stylish vegan shoes.

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Check out Faux Moccs here.

Jessica Schoech is the founder of The Vedge App, an up-and-coming app that will revolutionize the way we find veg food worldwide. She is a self-professed crunchy, vegan mom (cloth diapers, anyone?), wife, and foodie, who finds the most joy in welcoming people of all backgrounds to the green side, especially vegan parents and children. You can find her on Instagram, Facebook, Twitter and at Power to the Veg! on Facebook. Images courtesy Faux Moccs.

06/19/2012

Adorable kids sells vegan food in Denver! Makes you wish you lived here with me, huh?

This cutie got all dressed up in suspenders and sold lemon-and-mint sun tea and vegan banana bran muffins on the corner at a “goodies stand”! I love child labor, especially in costume!

[Can’t see the video? Click here to watch it on the local news]

05/06/2011

Happy Veggie Kids: Rowan!  »


Rowan is four years old and lives outside of Chicago (if you couldn’t tell). He’s vegan! And his mom says he’s the WORLD’S CUTEST vegan kid! He’s pretty darn cute.

Vegansaurus: What is your favorite food?
Rowan: Vegan cheese sandwich.

What is your favorite kind of birthday cake?
Blueberry and strawberry train cake.
[Mom note: I have no idea!]

Why are you vegan?
Because I don’t want to kill animals.

Do you like being vegan? Why?
Yes. And because, just because.

Is it ever hard to be vegan?
Yes.

What do your friends think about you being vegan?
They like to see what I have for lunch at school.

What is your favorite animal? Why?
Leopard! Because they are friendly.

Do you like pink dinosaurs? Can you draw one for us? We would love it!
No, because they’re not friendly.

[Mom note: He did draw a picture though] [Ed.: Yay! And the pink dino is friendly, I swear!]

Another Happy Veggie Kid! Thanks, Rowan!

05/05/2011

Happy Veggie Kids: Mac!  »

Hey people! Welcome to a new Vegansaurus series: Happy Veggie Kids! Are you tired of people acting like it’s child abuse or something to deny kids meat? OMG, the babies, they need the bacon! Without it, they will be pale and sickly weaklings! I, for one, am over it. So let’s show the world what happy and healthy little veggie kids are out there!

I have some great interviews with great kids and I’ll be rolling them out periodically. First kid up: Mac! Look at that face!
Mac is a three-year-old (almost four!) vegan living in Ottawa, ON, Canada.

Vegansaurus: What is your favorite food?
Mac: Hot potatoes.
[Mom note: He loves oven fries, mashed potatoes, pierogi, tater tots, latkes, anything potato!]

What is your favorite kind of birthday cake?
Lemon one with the pink icing like for my birthday last year.

Why are you vegan?
So I can be like you, Mommy. And because it’s nice and fun.

Do you like being vegan? Why?
Yeah because all the food is so yummy.

Is it ever hard to be vegan?
No it’s always soft to be vegan.
[Mom note: Ha!]

What do your friends think about you being vegan?
They think it’s great to be that.

What is your favorite animal? Why?
Cow because I want to hug ‘em.

Do you like pink dinosaurs? Can you draw one for us? We would love it!
Yeah that would be cool!
[Mom note: but he doesn’t know how to draw that, he says]

Yay! Thanks Mac! Our first happy vegan kid. Plus: how cute is he? Those cheeks! Email me if you want your vegan or vegetarian kid to participate!

11/28/2010

Happy Thanksgiving from reader Hortencia and her “little vegan family with a toddler in Oakland.” She says her husband made this very distinguished Tofurky with sweet potatoes, beets, carrots and onions, and her husband’s mother made all the side dishes vegan, and two vegan peach pies. Somebody won the parental lottery, vegan toddler! Happy Thanksgiving, Hortencia!

Happy Thanksgiving from reader Hortencia and her “little vegan family with a toddler in Oakland.” She says her husband made this very distinguished Tofurky with sweet potatoes, beets, carrots and onions, and her husband’s mother made all the side dishes vegan, and two vegan peach pies. Somebody won the parental lottery, vegan toddler! Happy Thanksgiving, Hortencia!

10/14/2010

No Trick Treats, for a happy vegan Halloween!  »

This has got me pretty excited! I love the holidays and especially the ones when people give me stuff and especially when that stuff is CANDY. What am I talking about? Halloween, adoy! But what about the vegan kiddies? How do they celebrate Halloween when all those dang houses give away non-vegan candy? Enter NoTrickTreats.com! It’s a site dedicated to listing houses giving away candy that meets special dietary needs, including veganism! It can create a map of your area that shows only the houses giving away vegan candy. Huzzah!

However, at the moment it’s kind of sparse. Like, super-sparse. As in, no houses in San Francisco. That’s spooky! And that’s why you gotta list your house! Are you giving away vegan goodies? Goody! Tell the world! Get your friends on board! You can also print flyers from the site to spread the word and post them on telephone poles and at Rainbow or Whole Foods or wherever (side note: if you’re feeling creative, the flyers need some design help).

Did you all get your vegan candy to give away yet? OMG GET YOURSELF TOGETHER! Luckily for you, VegNews has a handy list of vegan candy for you. Did you know Airheads are vegan? And PEZ! Pez are vegan! Pez are still the best ticket in town, if you ask me.

There’s also The Natural Candy Store if you want to do your vegan candy shopping online. They’ve got some sweet Halloween candy (like the jack-o-lantern lolli at the top!). They also sell Go Max Go bars and you can’t forget those, otherwise it’s basically child abuse.

Let’s take a moment to get into the real nitty gritty: what are your thoughts on vegan trick-or-treating? Some of Vegansaurus think you should let your kid go to whichever house and make their own decision about whether or not to keep it vegan. I mean not the little ones, but the older kids who go off with their friends. Another faction suggested letting the kids go out with their friends and make up their own minds about the candy, hoping she had “armed them with enough knowledge and Go Max Go bars to make the right choice!” See, Go Max Go bars are crucial.

What about you all? If you don’t give them free choice, will your kids be all resentful and dump the vegan lifestyle as soon as they can buy their own food (hey there, Zac Young of TC:JD)? Of course if your kids have a bunch of other vegan kiddie friends, maybe you don’t have to worry about this. Thoughts?

04/23/2010

The kid in the “Is Veganism Safe for Kids?” Scare? He’s a PESCATARIAN. OMG, SHUT UP, MEDIA. Oh also, same article says vegan diets are TOTALLY SAFE FOR KIDS. OMG SHUT UP AGAIN, MEDIA. (I apologize for this title! I am out of control! Love, Laura)  »

The Guardian posted a somewhat interesting article (nothing fully interests me anymore, le sigh) called “Is Veganism Safe for Kids?" It’s pretty mild and basically she’s like, give the kids supplements and vegan kids are probs healthier than non-vegan kids (I almost wrote "regular kids," but then I was like, what the eff are you trying to say about vegans, Megan Rascal?). I thought it was pretty positive overall, but I’m like the mayor of being wrong so who knows. It sounds good to me, though:

Amanda Baker at the Vegan Society says the real issue isn’t whether a child’s diet is vegan or not, or restricted or not-–the important thing is whether it’s healthy. “There are plenty of children who are eating a bad diet, and they’re not vegan,” she says. “Vegan parents have to plan their child’s food carefully. Of course there are pitfalls, but there are pitfalls for all parents and for any diet.

"The reality is that vegan parents are more likely to cook at home, and are likely to be very knowledgeable about nutrition because they have had to make a lot of effort to follow the diet they do. Many of them follow a wholefood diet, and avoid trans-fats and too much salt. It’s actually much easier for vegans and their children to meet the five-a-day guidelines than for other people."

The article was sparked by a recent case where social workers totally tried to take this kid from his parents because they thought his dairy-free diet gave him rickets. What the hell are rickets? I mean I know I can look it up but I’ve got the tireds so forgive me. But for real, rickets sounds like something you’d get in medieval times.

One important note: the kid isn’t even vegan, he’s pescatarian (sorry I said the P word! I just want everybody to make fun of pescatarians because it’s hilarious).

In cuter vegan kid topics, this seems like a good time to mention my favorite website everrr, veganlunchbox.com. It’s the best! Just lots and lots of cute-ass bento boxes filled with vegan goodies. There’s even a book! I have no kids and I have no bento boxes but I love this site.

11/25/2009

Adults of this species are somewhat terrifying but the kidlets are hella cute. Put them in one of these for the holidays and freak your whole family the fuck out. OMG YOU CAN’T MAKE HIM VEGAN HE’S GONNA STARVE TO DEATH*. Your reply? OR BE A GENIUS.
*or be totally healthy and live longer, better lives than his/her contemporaries. you can tell them that too.

Adults of this species are somewhat terrifying but the kidlets are hella cute. Put them in one of these for the holidays and freak your whole family the fuck out. OMG YOU CAN’T MAKE HIM VEGAN HE’S GONNA STARVE TO DEATH*. Your reply? OR BE A GENIUS.

*or be totally healthy and live longer, better lives than his/her contemporaries. you can tell them that too.

10/16/2009

Parents Raising Free-Range Vegans: You’ll Eat That Nugget, and Like It?   »

Parents rule. Literally, they’re supposed to be the rule makers, the head of the household, the buck stops before somebody gets grounded. But sometimes, like last night’s parental usurping by BalloonBoy Falcon Heene (“we did this for a show”), kids know best.

Highly publicized accounts of vegan parenting gone tragically wrong muddle the ongoing debate: should parents raise their children vegan? My favorite vegan parenting philosophy, told to me by the parent of a two-year-old being raised animal-free, “Right now, I’m in charge of what goes in her mouth. If she wanted to eat dog poop, I’d stop her. That’s my job while she can’t decide.” Disclosure: Despite the number of adorable sprites populating my friends’ Facebook feeds, I have no kids. I have also eaten dog poop, but I WAS two at the time, and the memory only exists in legend. It underscores the notion though: tiny kids just don’t know better.

What happens when kids are a little older and do know better? Blame it on the information age if you want to use the pejorative—but kids have access to more knowledge and are making corresponding life realizations earlier. Whether it’s more middle schoolers coming out of the closet, or more kids raised on chicken nuggets deciding, while still sitting at their parents’ table, anything in nugget format isn’t food—how should parents react?

This week, Huffington Post blogger, Donna Fish, wrote a post entitled, “Help! My Daughter’s a Vegan.” She launched in right away, “Am I supposed to be happy about this?” continuing to say that thinking about food too much seems “dogmatic and obsessive.” A mom who loves her T-bones she acknowledges she’s playing dietary roulette, citing the ground-beef paralyzed dancer, but meh—cheeseburgers are good! The conflict of an omnivorous parent of a veg child is summed up, “I have had to go against the fact that I hate that she is doing this, and support her.”

And then the kick-cringer: “Maybe it will just be a stage.” This isn’t a unique reaction. Longtime vegetarian Mike tells of a similar parental response: “My mom told me ‘it won’t last.’ That was 13 years ago. Does that make me veg out of spite?”

When a child makes a decision in opposition of a parent’s beliefs, to what extent are parents required to support it? On the scale from allowing it to happen, to making sure there are veg options on the grocery list and soy milk in the fridge, it strikes me that hoping it’s a stage is on the patronizing side. If a child is old enough to articulate that they don’t want to eat animals and provide an age-appropriate reason, to undermine that assertion of self, logic, and compassion is to prove that they’re not willing to support other expressions, be they “I’m gay” or “you made all of Colorado look for me while you made me hide in the garage.” Not cool. But, it takes a village (I hear.) Even if we don’t have kids ourselves, we can still be solid vegan role models for kids who might not have them at home—and a resource of info for parents who might be facing parenting a turned-veg kid. Maybe buttons? “I’m a Vegan, (Let Your Kid) Ask Me How.”

How supportive were your parents (or friends or significant others) when you vegged out? Is support important? There’s plenty o’ room for your coming out stories below…

P.S. If you’re a parent whose kid has seen the veg and you’re figuring out how to support their decision—whoooo! Here’s a treat for the trick or: the Top 10 Vegan Halloween Treats. If your kid wants to dress as a chicken instead of eat one, filling up their pumpkin it’s as easy as those good ol’ ABC123s.

This is the latest article in a recurring series, The Vegan Diplomat; The Art and Politics of Being Vegan in any Situation Society Throws on Your Plate, brought to us by the lovely Zoë Stagg. Zoë writes about politics, pop culture, and social media. She went cold-tofurkey—total omnivore to vegan on April 26, 2006 and never looked back. Despite her rural upbringing and the fact that her dad may have wanted her to enter the Dairy Princess pageant in high school, she firmly believes in the conservative nature of veganism. Her last non-vegan meal was a Turkey Lean Pocket. Ew.

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