vegansaurus!

05/05/2011

Mission Local is doing a new series in which Sabrina from the Tomato Tart (we love her!) is veganizing dishes around SF’s Mission District. SO FUCKING AWESOME.
First up: Humphry Slocombe’s (took me nine times to spell their damn name right) Secret Breakfast ice cream! The Secret Breakfast is one of the few appetizing flavors from Slocombe AND it contains bourbon, so we’re very happy she chose it! Now, off to make and eat gallons of this as it’s 10 billion degrees out and Hazel and I are panting in front of a fan in our underwear. OK, only one of us is wearing underwear. AND IT’S NOT ME. What! You gotta mix it up when you work from home!

Mission Local is doing a new series in which Sabrina from the Tomato Tart (we love her!) is veganizing dishes around SF’s Mission District. SO FUCKING AWESOME.

First up: Humphry Slocombe’s (took me nine times to spell their damn name right) Secret Breakfast ice cream! The Secret Breakfast is one of the few appetizing flavors from Slocombe AND it contains bourbon, so we’re very happy she chose it! Now, off to make and eat gallons of this as it’s 10 billion degrees out and Hazel and I are panting in front of a fan in our underwear. OK, only one of us is wearing underwear. AND IT’S NOT ME. What! You gotta mix it up when you work from home!

09/23/2010

Thursday: A good day for marble bundt cake (and its recipe)!  »

Knowing how to bake vegan is awesome. Sure, in larger cities, we’re pretty spoiled, and we can find vegan baked goods in cafes and grocery stores and sometimes even in vegan bakeries. However, even in the larger cities, there are still a lot more non-vegan baked goods than vegan ones, and there’s nothing worse than spying a lovely vision of a pastry or cake and then realizing it’s not vegan and that there’s no vegan version to be found… which brings me back to my original point: knowing how to bake vegan is awesome. Why? Because next time you see a sweet little non-vegan thing at the store or on a blog or in the newspaper or in a cookbook, you can smile to yourself and whip yourself up a superior vegan version at home.
This is a recipe that I doctored up when I had an insatiable, need-it-now craving for bundt cake this weekend (what, like you don’t get bundt cravings?). I came across this recipe for a marble bundt cake during an epic internet session this weekend, and I tell you, it spoke to me! The blogged recipe is for a chocolate-and-lemon marbled bundt, but since this Vegansaur thinks chocolate and lemon is a nasty-ass combo, I veganized it AND made it into a stately, elegant vanilla/chocolate combo.

The result, if I do say so myself, was pretty bangin’. Here’s the veganized recipe, and remember, bundts travel well, so this is a great cake for bringing to work (either to share or to hide in your desk and eat solo), on picnics, to the beach—whatever. This recipe makes a cake good enough to eat unadorned, but you can also top it with jam, vegan whip (whatever kind floats your boat), chocolate sauce, or fruit compote. The possibilities are endless!

Ingredients
2 cups sugar
1/3 cup cocoa powder
1 cup Earth Balance(or your butter analog of choice)
egg replacer for four eggs (I used a combo of 2 Ener-G eggs and 1/3 cup plain soy yogurt)
3 1/2 cups cake flour (you can use regular if it’s all you’ve got, but I like the cake flour—it’s so fancy!)
1 Tbsp baking powder
1/2 tsp salt
1 1/4 cups nondairy milk (I use almond)
2 tsp vanilla extract
2 to 3 Tbsp booze, such as Kahlua, rum, Frangelico (optional)

Directions
1. Prep your bundt pan (grease it and then lightly flour it) and preheat your oven to 350.

2. Cream together your “butter” and sugar. Make sure to mix it until it gets slightly fluffy and the color lightens slightly. Add in your egg replacer slowly and continue to beat the mixture until all the ingredients are incorporated, and it’s silky-looking.

3. In a medium-sized bowl, mix together the flour, baking powder, and salt. Then add half the dry mixture to the wet mixture and stir to combine. Add half the nondairy milk and the vanilla to the mixture and combine. Repeat addition of dry and then wet until the batter is smooth. Warning: do NOT overmix, unless you’re into dry, tough cakes.

4. Pour half the batter into prepared bundt pan; keep the other half in the mixing bowl. Add the cocoa (and booze if you are using it) to the reserved batter and mix to combine. Then pour the chocolate batter into the bundt pan. Use a butter knife to swirl around the batters and incorporate them into each other. Bake for 50 to 60 minutes, or until a toothpick inserted into the middle of the cake comes out clean.

Let the thing cool for a while before you try to take it out of the pan—attempting to remove it while it’s still warm will only result in tears!

Enjoy for breakfast, lunch, or dinner!

08/19/2010

Secret to Vegan Feast’s nut kreme revealed!  »

Your Vegansaurus LOVES Vegan Feast’s blog. She posts the most gorgeous photos of the most delicious-sounding recipes that make us hungry basically all the time. That is to say, when we are actively eating something, looking at close-up of a vegan caesar salad or some kind of insane roulade makes whatever we’re eating seem like it was made by a dog and a spiteful child.

Lucky for us, she posts recipes for at least half of the dishes she features—unfortunately, a lot of them call for this beautiful, fluffy white stuff she calls “nut kreme,” the recipe for which seems to never have appeared anywhere—until today! And look at how simple it is! You could make nut kremes for days! You could freeze it and make nut kreme Cool Whip (you know “new” Cool Whip has actual milk in it? Puke) and eat it with a spoon when that void inside gets too big to fill with books or television or animal/human companionship! Your Vegansaurus cannot wait to blow all our money on assorted nuts and live off nut kreme and peach cobbler (all the food groups covered!).

veganfeast:

I promised a post about nut kremes this morning, so let’s talk.

I usually make nut kreme straight from any type of nut but you could try it from a nut milk and add to it. I love to use hazelnuts but almonds and cashews are nice also.

The skins can be difficult to remove from hazelnuts, so I have implemented this technique:
For 1 cup of nuts, bring 3 cups of water to a boil. Add 4 tablespoons of baking soda and the nuts and boil them for 3 minutes. The water will turn black from the nut skins. Rinse the nuts well under cold running water, then use your fingers to remove the skins.
Return the nuts to 2 cups of water for a soak.

After the soak process, turn into a mixer and beat with 1/2 cup agave syrup and a scraped vanilla bean, adding more water as necessary until light and creamy.

I usually soak the hazelnuts for at least an hour and then drain the liquid, but keep it in reserve, and process, adding the water back a little as needed, then add agave and vanilla and whip until I get the consistency I want. Depending upon the freshness and sweetness of the nuts, you may need more or less water returned to the mix….you can also use coconut or soy milk in instead of the water entirely and use the leftover milk for a different cooking project.

Experiment until you find the kreme that you like best and above all have fun!

06/11/2010

Vegan pissaladière, from Beard on Bread!
The recipe calls for a brioche crust, which I also had to veganize. It was way easy because I only had wheat flour, so I just made flax eggs because the wheat grains obscured the flax flecks.
Brioche recipe (adapted from Beard on Bread)Ingredients (makes two)1.5 packages active dry yeast1/2 cup warm water1.5 Tbs. sugar1/2 cup melted Earth Balance1/2 cup olive oil1 tsp. salt1/4 cup flax meal plus 3/4 cup water (equivalent of four eggs)4 cups whole wheat flour
InstructionsCombine yeast, sugar and water, and let sit. Mix up flax meal and water until fully integrated. Add olive oil to melted Earth Balance and salt. In a bowl, combine all the ingredients, and mix by hand until smooth (I ended up using my hands). Place in a greased bowl, cover, and allow to sit in a warm place to rise until it has doubled in size, about 90 minutes. Begin pissaladière.
Pissaladière recipe (adapted from Beard on Bread)Ingredients (makes two)1 pound canned tomatoes (Italian or plain)3 Tbs. tomato pasteOlive oil5 cloves garlic, peeled and crushed3 medium onions3 Tbs. Earth Balance1/2 tsp. fresh rosemary1 Tbs. fresh basilKalamata olives
InstructionsHeat olive oil in a skillet. Rinse tomatoes, then add them, tomato paste and garlic to olive oil and let them reduce to a paste over medium-low heat, stirring occasionally. Peel and chop the onions and steam them in the earth balance over lowest heat, covered, until they form a thick sort of puree. This should take the entire 90 minutes of the first rise of the brioche.
Following the first rise, punch down the brioche dough and separate it into two pieces. Roll each piece out, and line two greased nine-inch cake tins. Cover and let rise “slightly”—I gave mine 20 minutes while I chopped the herbs. Preheat the oven to 375 F.
Spread the onions on the brioche dough, then sprinkle them with herbs, then cover that with the tomato sauce. Finally, if you want olives, sink them on the top. Bake for 25 to 30 minutes, until the crust has crisped and browned. Serve hot.

Vegan pissaladière, from Beard on Bread!

The recipe calls for a brioche crust, which I also had to veganize. It was way easy because I only had wheat flour, so I just made flax eggs because the wheat grains obscured the flax flecks.

Brioche recipe (adapted from Beard on Bread)
Ingredients (makes two)
1.5 packages active dry yeast
1/2 cup warm water
1.5 Tbs. sugar
1/2 cup melted Earth Balance
1/2 cup olive oil
1 tsp. salt
1/4 cup flax meal plus 3/4 cup water (equivalent of four eggs)
4 cups whole wheat flour

Instructions
Combine yeast, sugar and water, and let sit. Mix up flax meal and water until fully integrated. Add olive oil to melted Earth Balance and salt. In a bowl, combine all the ingredients, and mix by hand until smooth (I ended up using my hands). Place in a greased bowl, cover, and allow to sit in a warm place to rise until it has doubled in size, about 90 minutes. Begin pissaladière.

Pissaladière recipe (adapted from Beard on Bread)
Ingredients (makes two)
1 pound canned tomatoes (Italian or plain)
3 Tbs. tomato paste
Olive oil
5 cloves garlic, peeled and crushed
3 medium onions
3 Tbs. Earth Balance
1/2 tsp. fresh rosemary
1 Tbs. fresh basil
Kalamata olives

Instructions
Heat olive oil in a skillet. Rinse tomatoes, then add them, tomato paste and garlic to olive oil and let them reduce to a paste over medium-low heat, stirring occasionally. Peel and chop the onions and steam them in the earth balance over lowest heat, covered, until they form a thick sort of puree. This should take the entire 90 minutes of the first rise of the brioche.

Following the first rise, punch down the brioche dough and separate it into two pieces. Roll each piece out, and line two greased nine-inch cake tins. Cover and let rise “slightly”—I gave mine 20 minutes while I chopped the herbs. Preheat the oven to 375 F.

Spread the onions on the brioche dough, then sprinkle them with herbs, then cover that with the tomato sauce. Finally, if you want olives, sink them on the top. Bake for 25 to 30 minutes, until the crust has crisped and browned. Serve hot.

page 1 of 1
Tumblr » powered Sid05 » templated