vegansaurus!

07/16/2012

Check out this awesome bridge just for wildlife! It’s in Banff National Park in Canada, because Canada knows how to do shit right. There’s a whole gallery of rad highway overpasses for animals at The World Geography, from which I yoinked this pic. Imagine if we made a lot of these! No more road kill, ever! Animals could hold parties on them, or stand there and strategically poop on cars! I can’t wait, it’s gonna be AWESOME!

Check out this awesome bridge just for wildlife! It’s in Banff National Park in Canada, because Canada knows how to do shit right. There’s a whole gallery of rad highway overpasses for animals at The World Geography, from which I yoinked this pic. Imagine if we made a lot of these! No more road kill, ever! Animals could hold parties on them, or stand there and strategically poop on cars! I can’t wait, it’s gonna be AWESOME!

01/17/2012

newyorker:

Video: Saving the Plowshare Tortoise 
This week in the magazine, William Finnegan travels to Madagascar  with Eric Goode [sub. req.], a Manhattan night-life baron “who tramps through  mountains looking for turtles, tortoises, snakes, lizards, frogs,  crocodilians,” Finnegan writes.
In this video, Goode seeks out the world’s rarest turtle, the  plowshare tortoise. While trying to help save it from extinction, he  travels to a wildlife conservatory and finds himself in a high-risk  negotiation with local smugglers.


Learn all about the plowshare tortoise with the New Yorker!
Naturally, the babies are super cute.
Click through to watch the video, where these screencaps come from.

newyorker:

Video: Saving the Plowshare Tortoise

This week in the magazine, William Finnegan travels to Madagascar with Eric Goode [sub. req.], a Manhattan night-life baron “who tramps through mountains looking for turtles, tortoises, snakes, lizards, frogs, crocodilians,” Finnegan writes.

In this video, Goode seeks out the world’s rarest turtle, the plowshare tortoise. While trying to help save it from extinction, he travels to a wildlife conservatory and finds himself in a high-risk negotiation with local smugglers.

Learn all about the plowshare tortoise with the New Yorker!

Naturally, the babies are super cute.

Click through to watch the video, where these screencaps come from.

04/29/2011

The power of language: “pets” vs. “companion animals”  »


The Journal of Animal Ethics may be a new publication, but it’s already raised an intriguing issue: What should we call other animals?

Domestic dogs, cats, bunnies, hamsters, snakes, and what-have-you shall henceforth be referred to as “companion animals” rather than “pets,” while the humans formerly known as “owners” ought to be called “human carers,” the academics say. To do otherwise is insulting, they say. While “critters” and “beasts” are understandably decried, even the term “wildlife” is not safe. WHAT. 

From the article:

We shall not be able to think clearly unless we discipline ourselves to use less than partial adjectives in our exploration of animals and our moral relations with them.

I agree that certain widespread language used to talk about animals (“crazy like a fox” and “eating like a pig”) could be both a symptom and a cause of animal abuse, and I call the cat who lives with me by her name, but come on, “wildlife”? Is this going too far? Is it not far enough? Is it just right? What do you think?

[photo from the Telegraph]

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